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Where Has the Science Gone?

It is regrettable that the inquiry into the fundamental question of origins has degenerated to such an emotional level. Attitudes must be improved, and efforts now devoted to name-calling should be redirected towards good scholarship. Published in Origins v. 10, n. 2.

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Puzzles

Studying origins from a scientific perspective can be compared with assembling a puzzle when some of the pieces are missing and the overall picture is unknown. To produce a picture at the meaning level can be done only by patterning it after one's world view — the composite of all one's acquired knowledge and experiences. Published in Origins v. 9, n. 2.

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The Dogmatic Skeptic

A review of the book, Science: Good, Bad and Bogus. The book vigorously attacks anyone whose beliefs are considered pseudoscience. Published in Origins v. 9, n. 2.

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Axioms

Axioms, or untestable assumptions, are a necessary part of science. Creationists and evolutionists differ in their axioms, and this leads to conflicts in their interpretations. Published in Origins v. 9, n. 1.

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Perceptions of the Nature of Science and Christian Strategies for a Science of Nature

When scientific pronouncements and religious beliefs conflict, what options are open to the Christian? The answer depends upon a host of things, but surely upon how science and religion are perceived. The present essay is confined largely to a consideration of the potential role played by various views of science, though many of the points made might be adapted readily to views of religion as well. Published in Origins v. 9, n. 1.

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Skepticism and Truth

Review of the journal, The Skeptical Inquirer. This journal focuses on debunking ideas considered to be unreliable, but accepts without question a naturalistic foundational basis. Published in Origins v. 9, n. 1.

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Scientific Creationism?

Creationism can be structured as a biblically-based religious doctrine, or as a method for exploring the world that is open to the possibility of creation. It would be inappropriate for religious creationism to be taught in public schools, but a scientific approach that considers the possibility of a creator need not be excluded. Published in Origins v. 8, n. 2.

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But Is It As Much Fun?

Many scientists worry that acknowledging God's activities in nature would hinder scientific advance, but it might make science more exciting and fun if there is always the possibility that God is active in nature. Published in Origins v. 8, n. 1.

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Arkansas Act 590

Is the teaching of creation in science classes of public schools unconstitutional? This question has been put to the legal test in the State of Arkansas, one of the first states in recent times to pass a creation bill (Arkansas Act 590) into law. Published in Origins v. 8, n. 1.

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Supernatural Problems

It may be an oversimplification, but the separation of evolutionary and creation ideas pivots around the rejection and acceptance of the presence of the miraculous. Published in Origins v. 7, n. 2.

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Beyond Design

Creationists who want to use the scientific method need to develop and test theories based on creation, and not to be satisfied merely to show that some phenomenon is designed. Published in Origins v. 7, n. 1.

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Georgia House Bill 690

A bill in the Georgia state legislature mandating the teaching of creation when evolution is taught was passed in both houses of the legislature but differences in the two versions prevented it being passed into law. Supporters hope to see it passed in the next session of the legislature. Published in Origins v. 7, n. 1.

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A Methodological Manual

A review of the book, How to Think About Evolution and Other Bible-Science Controversies. Written for creationists, the book mainly addresses questions of speciation and change, and proposes that conflict between creationists and evolutionists is often due to failure of communication, and both sides should be regarded as engaged in honest attempts to discover truth. Published in Origins v. 7, n. 1.

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Public Opinions Regarding Creation and Evolution

A recent Gallup poll showed that about half the U.S. population believe in the creation of Adam and Eve as the first humans. University education tends to reduce belief in creation, suggesting a pattern of indoctrination during university education. Published in Origins v. 7, n. 1.

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Beyond Science

Exclusion of the supernatural by science has restricted theories of origins to purely naturalistic processes. Large numbers of people are looking for broader explanatory approaches that accommodate their own experiences of love, morality and beauty. Published in Originsi v. 7, n. 1.

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The Attitude of University Students Toward the Teaching of Creation and Evolution in the Schools

This study has shown that the majority of both graduate and undergraduate students favor the two-model approach for the teaching of origins. Published in Origins v. 6, n. 2.

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Publicity for Creation

Lack of academic freedom is claimed by students who want both creation and evolution taught in biology classes at Iowa State University, and is reflected in several Darwinian-based publications. Published in Origins v. 6, n. 2.

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Is Truth Dead?

We should be careful to present our views in truthful and informed ways because it is more important to find truth than to defend our ideas. Published in Origins v. 6, n. 1.

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Creation in the Courts

Creationists are using the courts to try to get creation theory included as a theory of origins alongside evolution, while evolutionists are using the courts to try to prevent this. Published in Origins v. 6, n. 1.

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Suing the Smithsonian

The Smithsonian Institution is being sued for promoting humanistic religion in the form of evolution. The court has ruled in favor of the Smithsonian, and the suit is unlikely to win on appeal. Published in Origins v. 5, n. 2.

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