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The Riddle of Migratory Birds: Another Evidence of God’s Design

How does one account for bird migrations? Why do they migrate at all? How do they know when it’s time to begin the long journey? What guides their flight path and direction? How do they know their destination, and how do they prepare for the trip?

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Polyphyly and the Cambrian Explosion

Most animal phyla, including those with soft bodies, appear in Cambrian sediments, in a pattern called the Cambrian Explosion. This pattern is exactly opposite of that predicted by Darwin's theory, but is readily explained in the context of creation and a global catastrophe. Published in Origins n. 53.

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A Baraminological Analysis of Subtribe Flaveriinae (Asteraceae: Helenieae)

The subtribe Flaveriinae is a group in the sunflower family. This group of plants appears to have diversified from a single ancestral species after the flood. Published in Origins n. 52.

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Geological Society of America Meeting

A report of the 2000 meeting of the Geological Society of America in Reno, Nevada. Published in Origins n. 51.

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The Trilobite: Enigma of Complexity, Evidence for Intelligent Design

Trilobites are complex, elaborately segmented forms with jointed appendages and swimmerets, antennae, compound eyes, and cephalized, or head-to-tail, nervous systems.

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Ecology, Biodiversity, and Creation: A View from the Top

The complex and vitally essential ecology and biodiversity we find in nature today, at the top of the structural hierarchy of nature, suggest that many interacting organisms would have been required right from the beginning. Only a short-term creation would provide such ecosystem requirements.

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Literature reviews: Intelligent Design Comes of Age

A review of the book, Mere Creation: Science, Faith & Intelligent Design. Published in Origins v. 25, n. 2.

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Fossil Patterns: A Classification and Evaluation

One of the most interesting challenges in understanding Earth history is explanation of the order in the fossil record. Study of fossil patterns and trends should help improve our understanding of the underlying processes. Published in Origins v. 23, n. 2.

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Fewer Answers Than Questions

A review of the book, Rates of Evolution. Published from a symposium on evolution. Published in Origins v. 16, n. 2.

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Punc Eq Creation Style

Most punctuated equilibria theories explain why proposed exceptions tend to be in the Upper Cenozoic. Punq Eq Creation Style, however, not only predicts the stasis and abrupt appearance of species, but it also predicts that exceptions will be found in the Upper Cenozoic among forminifera. Because of its greater explanatory power, PECS teoyr is superior to other PE theories. Published in Origins v. 16, n. 1.

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Debunking Darwin

A review of the book, Darwinism: The Refutation of a Myth. Written by a developmental biologist emphasizing the inadequacy of Darwinian evolutionary theory and advocating the importance of developmental processes in evolution. Published in Origins v. 16, n. 1.

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Foraminifers in the Fossil Record: Implications for an Ecological Zonation Model

Foraminifers exemplify many of the problems of fitting the fossil record into a short chronology, including thousands of named species and apparent evolutionary sequences. Any short-time creationist model must be able to explain these features. Published in Origins v. 15, n. 1.

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Which Vertebrates Make Vitamin C?

Vitamin C is important in vertebrate physiology, but is acquired in different ways. Some mammals and perching birds do not synthesize it and must get it in their diet. Most other mammals and birds synthesize vitamin C, in their kidneys, the livers, or both. The pattern of synthesizing sometimes follows taxonomic patterns and sometimes not. Published in Origins v. 12, n. 2.

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Stratigraphic Distribution of Vertebrate Fossil Footprints Compared with Body Fossils

Bird and mammal footprints are most common in the same stratigraphic intervals where their body fossils are common. However, reptile and amphibian tracks are more common in stratigraphic layers lower than their body fossils. Published in Origins v. 9, n. 2.

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Temperature Regulation in Tetrapod Vertebrates: Ectotherms vs. Endotherms

Animals with high metabolic rates (birds and mammals) are capable of greater work output (speed, etc) but are restricted in size and shape in order to avoid losing too much body heat. Reptiles and amphibians have lower metabolic rates, and can survive at much smaller sizes and elongated shapes than birds or mammals. This is interpreted as a result of design for a diverse ecosystem. Published in Origins v. 9, n. 2.

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The “Australian Problem”

A review of the book, Ecological Biogeography of Australia. An exhaustive review of the geology, flora nad fauna of Australia. Published in Origins v. 8, n. 2.

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Coral Reef Growth

Coral reefs take time to grow, and some have questioned whether certain coral reefs could have grown to their present size in the time since the Flood. Evidence reported here indicates that rates of coral reef growth are quite variable, depending on water temperature, carbonate concentration, and depth. At the surface, ultraviolet light inhibits coral growth, so surficial measurements of coral growth are not a good basis for estimating rates of growth. Under ideal conditions, coral is capable of growing fast enough to produce present coral reefs in the time since the Flood. Published in Origins v. 6, n. 2.

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Tracing the Tales

A review of the book, The Two-taled Dinosaur. Dinosaurs, and other fossils, can be interpreted in more than one way. Published in Origins v. 4, n. 2.

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Is a Yak a Buffalo?

A review of the book, Variation and Fixity in Nature. The nature of created kinds (baramins) is discussed and evaluated. Published in Origins v. 4, n. 2.

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Do Rabbits Chew the Cud?

Rabbits have a mechanism for re-processing food after it has fermented in the cecum. This is functionally equivalent to the cud-chewing of cattle, in which fermented food is redirected so that the nutrients produced by bacterial action can be utilized by the mammal. Published in Origins v. 4, n. 2.

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