Geoscience Research Institute

IN A FEW WORDS

Origins 7(2):47 (1980).

Brief summaries of the main conclusions of the leading presentations are given below for those who may find the complete articles too long or technical.


THE MEANING OF THE CHRONOGENEALOGIES OF GENESIS 5 AND 11

    In ORIGINS 7:23-37, Hasel presented arguments showing that the genealogies found in Genesis 5 and 11 were unique to biblical literature and that they should be read as given. In the companion article appearing in this issue, Hasel further examines these chronogenealogies and the meaning of the literary figures used in the text. Using literary and archaeological-historical data, he compares the biblical text to extrabiblical literature and history. Also included are analyses of other theories of interpretation.

IMPLICATIONS OF VARIOUS INTERPRETATIONS OF THE FOSSIL RECORD

    Between the two extremes of a literal six-day creation week and evolutionary theory are a significant number of models for origins. Each has its own unique set of assumptions and problems that it attempts to syncretize. Roth examines ten models for origins and discusses the problems that led to their formulation. Included are the supports that have been mustered for each model, along with a comment as to its difficulties in the light of both science and the Bible. The philosophical implications of these ideas are also examined.


1980

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